Darktrace uses machine-learning for improved cyber-security

Darktrace uses machine-learning for improved cyber-security

Darktrace uses machine-learning for improved cyber-security
Darktrace uses machine-learning for improved cyber-security

Darktrace has announced a new cyber-attack prevention product, Darktrace Antigena, which uses machine-learning to allow computer networks to automatically defend themselves.

Darktrace claims to be the first company to arm machines with machine-learning and algorithms so that the networks can detect and remove threats as they develop – and all without the need for human intervention.

The cyber security software could, potentially, be extremely useful for a number of companies and their IT security teams, who have typically struggled to manually detect attacks in a short space of time. Indeed, numerous attacks have indicated that it can take over six months for an organisation to spot a data breach.

Real-time cyber security

Darktrace says that if an attack does occur, employees don’t need to intervene as Antigena will eradicate the threat, first by slowing the attack activity in real-time so as to stop it spreading further throughout the network.

Nicole Eagan, CEO of Darktrace, said in a statement: “The battlefield is the corporate network – we cannot fight the battle on the border anymore. We are living through a new era of threat which is relentless and pernicious – and it’s inside our networks now. Today, we have arrived at new detection that reacts faster than any security team can.”

Also read: Telefonica’s ElevenPaths to release IoT security solution

Cyber-security and immune systems

“Antigena is a major new step forward in ‘immune system’ defence – providing more automation, freeing up more people and equipping them with ammunition that actually works – in this new phase of perpetual internal threat.”

The Antigena modules include Antigena Internet, which regulates user and machine access to the Internet; Antigena Communication, which regulates email and other messaging protocols; and Antigena Network, which regulates machine and network connectivity along with user access permissions.

Also read: GSMA launches new IoT security guidelines