Californian based software shop Xperiel has taken the wraps off of its cloud-based Real World Web (RWW) platform. Designed to represent a programming environment suitable for building so-called ‘Internet of Things (IoT) experiences’.

“Xperiel is breaking new ground by providing a highly abstracted language for building event driven device agnostic applications as well as an IoT-centric connectivity fabric that ties together devices, events and content to enable customer engagement,” said Stephen Hendrick, principal analyst for application development and deployment research, ESG

Xperiel’s three components:

  • Graphical programming language – The completely cloud-based Xperiel pebbling language opens doors for non-technical people to build applications that can be ‘iterated on the fly’ based on real-time user feedback and analytics. This design-oriented, graphical language prevents applications from delivering stale interactions.
  • Device-agnostic apps in the cloud – Applications developed with Xperiel are entirely cloud-based without sacrificing native performance. This means they can be programmed once and work on any device regardless of operating system or platform. They can be standalone, merged into existing apps or even run without needing to be installed.
  • Universal trigger fabric – Xperiel connects any hardware or software — past, present or future — to the IoT by turning it into an interaction point that triggers Xperiel applications through existing sensors built into mobile phones, wearables, virtual reality and augmented reality headsets, etc.

LA Dodgers soda cups

According to the firm, this combination of technologies allows brands to connect everything — from score boards to signage to beverage cups and social media channels — to Xperiel applications. It also provides new ways to engage consumers and opens up untapped revenue streams that help marketing teams maximize campaigns.

“Dodger Stadium provides our ball club with unlimited opportunities to connect with fans through their mobile devices during home games. Opportunities include everything from promoting special offers to providing personalized greetings on our big screens to playing sponsored games and contests where they can win meetings with their favorite players,” said Tucker Kain, Los Angeles Dodgers CFO. “Xperiel is turning our park and everything in it into a giant physical-digital ecosystem, where every inch of real estate can become digitally interactive, connecting fans with experiences that drive higher engagement rates, monetization and fun.”

Experiential marketing

Xperiel says it provides unlimited opportunities for the IoT — one of its early use cases is experiential marketing for mobile devices at scale. Currently, most mobile marketing is comprised of pop-up ads that are being ignored by recipients or avoided altogether due to ad blocking technologies.

“There are a lot of IoT platforms available on the market, and Xperiel is the only company that has figured out a way to take every piece of IoT technology and tie it together in an effective and mainstream way,” said Alex Hertel, CEO and cofounder, Xperiel. “With Xperiel providing an orchestration layer for the IoT we’ve opened up the door for an infinite amount of possible interactions between people, machines and devices, bringing to market the consumer-facing portion of IoT that we call the Real World Web.”

 


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I am a technology journalist with over two decades of press experience. Primarily I work as a news analysis writer dedicated to a software application development ‘beat’; but, in a fluid media world, I am also an analyst, technology evangelist and content consultant. As the previously narrow discipline of programming now extends across a wider transept of the enterprise IT landscape, my own editorial purview has also broadened. I have spent much of the last ten years also focusing on open source, data analytics and intelligence, cloud computing, mobile devices and data management. I have an extensive background in communications starting in print media, newspapers and also television. If anything, this gives me enough man-hours of cynical world-weary experience to separate the spin from the substance, even when the products are shiny and new.